Sitting Comfortably?

Sitting Comfortably?

Porsche’s interior’s have long been celebrated for their individuality, reflecting the marque’s desire to go its own way

If, like Style for Miles, you were once young, you may remember peering into a Porsche at the school gates and wondering at its fantastical interior - a distinctive distraction from the plethora of utilitarian Fords and Vauxhalls. It seemed to confirm the initial external impression that these cars were different.

And if there’s a particular interior feature that stood out back in those formative years, we’d approximate that 93.7% of respondents would say the dramatic seat design. So if you’re sitting comfortably, here’s five to take you down memory lane.
This particular Porsche 928, with its tastefully 80s red and white stripes, features the subtle Ferry Porsche signature on its headrests. And to be honest, Style for Miles wouldn’t have it any other way.
Stripes have been around for a while and have been a reoccurring theme in Porsche’s seat design. We have it on good authority that this G-Series was the last 3.2-litre 911 ever built, leaving the factory in 1989. The combination of Carrera White Metallic paint finish (again take out word for it) and pinstripe interior design perhaps a fitting tribute to the end of the 80s.
This “Louise” 911 Turbo car, named after Louise Piëch, was the first turbo engine in a Carrera body, but far more pressing is its near total tartan interior, reflecting its Scottish roots, possibly.
What we have here is the interior of a 901 bearing chassis number 57, the oldest 911 derivative owned by the Porsche Museum. The so-called "Pepita" hounds-tooth pattern was employed internally, to great effect, creating a debonair Porsche signature style.
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There are few things more inherently stylish than a Porsche 911 Targa SC, complete with Pasha pattern interior. What stands out further in this particular case is the colour choice: navy blue with black contrasts. Produced as of summer 1977, these models were given the SC “Super Carrera” suffix as a reminder of the history of the 356, like you don't know.