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Like Roswell and Area 51, we can only speculate what Porsche has got up to behind closed doors - however here’s a few of its prototypes that managed to escape

Porsche, by its very nature, is always destined to create vehicles that don’t conform, that push the boundaries and serve up something just that bit different.

However, whether the paying public will buy into certain developments is another thing, but hey, what’s the harm in trying? So Style for Miles brings you five prototypes that didn’t quite make it into production.

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984 Roadster - From 1984 to 1987, the engineers worked on a prototype of a futuristic vehicle concept: the Porsche 984, a compact, lightweight and aerodynamic roadster - what were they thinking?! Producing just 135hp, they wanted to focus on reduced air resistance instead of high performance – hence its unladen weight of 880kg.
Cayenne Cabrio - Continuing with the ‘What were they thinking?’ theme, but this time removing the tongue from the cheek, we have this portable walk-in bath for four. The Cayenne “Cabrio” has two different rear designs. Normally, two different designs would result in two prototypes being built,however, the engineers chose to adopt a more cost-effective approach, possibly to avoid it going into production...
911 Carrera 3.2 Speedster - This Porsche 911 Carrera 3.2 Speedster was built in 1987. A no frills one-seater, it was designed for pure driving pleasure – just like the first Speedster in the 1950s. This prototype with the 911 Carrera body is the predecessor to the 911 Speedster proper, which we feel works better.
Panamericana - This Porsche “Panamericana” was presented to Ferry Porsche for his 80th birthday in 1989. Porsche comments that its seamless lines run smoothly into the next across the car. Well perhaps, however we see something else, simply chop the roof and you have your very own German Beach Buggy. The “Panamericana” development process lasted just a few months and included some elements that were seen again in the subsequent 993 generation, 911.
Porsche 918 Spyder "Rolling Chassis" - Modern digital methods allow systems and components to be virtually tested at an early stage and extensively tested in conjunction with other systems – even before real-life prototypes are available. However, in the case of the 918 Spyder ‘rolling chassis’ there was no option but to try out the hybrid drivetrain. So, in spring 2012, selected journalists were invited to the test track in Weissach, where the “rolling chassis” was intended to convince them of the feasibility of the 918 Spyder and its electric intentions.